Frankenstein Created Woman (1967)
Directed by Terence Fisher

Starring Derek Fowlds Peter Cushing Peter Cushing Peter Madden Robert Morris Susan Denberg Thorley Walters

The same year as "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club" band and the Summer of Love, Hammer Studios decided to make a great Cushing Frankenstein film. This is another masterpiece from director Fisher, who brought us both "Curse of …" and "Revenge of Frankenstein"—not to mention the greatest vampire film ever, "Horror of Dracula." This follow up to the inferior "Evil of Frankenstein," has Frankie back in business. He`s figured out what went wrong with his past experiments: He wasn`t able to prevent the human soul from leaving the body after death. After mastering the technique, he waits until a suitable subject for his experiment arrives.

The subject arrives in the form of badly scarred servant girl Denberg, who is having a torrid affair with an angry young peasant boy named Hans. When he was a child, Hans saw his alcoholic father being beheaded for murder and it was a blow to his self esteem. Now, of course, he works for Frankenstein. But when he's framed by a group of young rich men for the murder of his girlfriend`s father, he is also executed. Once she learns what happens, she kills herself.

Enter Frankenstein. He takes the soul of Hans and puts it in the body of Denberg. He also removes physical defects from her body, so that she looks exactly the way Playboy Playmate Denberg looked: shapely, blonde, babe-titious. (Despite her Playboy credentials, she keeps her clothes on during this film.)

Denberg then goes out on a revenge spree, seducing and gleefully killing off the men who framed Hans.

Like all the great Hammer films, this once again tackles the issue of class, with the spirit of a dead peasant exacting revenge on the rich boys who murdered him. The justice system favors the rich at the expense of the poor. In this corrupt and hypocritical system, Frankenstein's experiments don't seem so monstrous. In fact, Frankenstein is portrayed more as a good guy this time around---a far cry from the murderous character he played in the very first Hammer Frankenstein.

All in all, this is a marvelous film, one that has been gloriously remastered by Anchor Bay for DVD.

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-- Review by Lucius Gore

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